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Can Castor Oil Help With Puffy Eyes?

If you've been struggling with persistently puffy, swollen-looking eyes, you're certainly not alone. I used to wake up with puffy eyes every morning for about a year. I tried everything from caffeine gels to coffee masks to ice rollers but nothing worked. 

It was pretty frustrating going through constant trial and error process with expensive beauty products that came with big promises (read: marketing) only to find that nothing was working - until I discovered the magic of IAMA Castor Oil.

Since then, I'm happy to say that I haven't had a single day of puffy eyes!

I started using castor oil every night before bed, massaging it gently around my eye, and now I only really need to use it once a week, but it feels so luxurious for my skin that I do apply it more often.

Caffeine-infused eye creams and serums have become a popular go-to for tackling under-eye puffiness, but their efficacy is limited. The logic behind using caffeine is that, as a vasoconstrictor, it temporarily tightens blood vessels and minimizes fluid buildup around the eyes. However caffeine doesn't address the underlying causes of puffiness.

What Causes Puffy Eyes?

Puffy eyes can be caused by a variety of factors - from hormonal changes and fluid retention to aging and genetics.

Hormonal fluctuations, especially estrogen dominance or excess aldosterone, can cause the body to retain more fluid. Imbalances in thyroid hormones, such as hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) or hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), can also affect fluid balance and cause fluid retention around the eyes. Dysregulation of the adrenal glands, which produce hormones like cortisol, can lead to increased inflammation and fluid accumulation around the eyes.

One of the primary culprits is fluid retention.

The delicate skin around our eyes is prone to accumulating excess fluid, which then pools and creates that unflattering 'bags under the eyes' look.

Factors that can contribute to fluid buildup include hormonal changes, high salt intake, allergies, and even lack of sleep.

Ageing is also a common factor, as the skin and muscles around our eyes naturally get thinner as we get older. This means water and fat deposits appear to protrude more which exacerbates the puffiness.

Lifestyle habits like alcohol consumption, smoking, and excessive screen time can further exacerbate the issue by causing inflammation, disrupting sleep, and dehydrating the skin. Of course, in some cases, puffy eyes may be a symptom of an underlying medical condition. 


When it comes to tackling stubborn under-eye puffiness, IAMA Castor Oil is the natural remedy you didn't know you needed! The ricinoleic acid in Castor Oil has impressive anti-inflammatory properties. This helps to soothe swelling and fluid buildup that can lead to that unwanted bags-under-the-eyes look.

 

But the benefits of castor oil don't stop there - it's also an exceptional emollient, meaning it can deeply moisturize and improve the elasticity of the delicate skin around the eyes. This helps minimize the appearance of puffiness by tightening and toning the area.

 

Some research even suggests castor oil may stimulate increased circulation and lymphatic drainage, further reducing fluid retention. 

How to Use IAMA Castor Oil for Puffy Eyes

For best results, gently massage a small amount of pure, high-quality castor oil around the orbital bone each night before bed. With consistent use, this versatile natural oil can help you achieve a brighter, more wide-awake appearance by tackling the root causes of under-eye puffiness

P.S To help you get the most out of nature's golden elixir, with every purchase of IAMA Castor Oil, you'll receive our FREE user guide! 

P.P.S Check out our favourite castor oil beauty blends, rituals and recipes here

If you're unsure about anything or just want to say hi, you can get in touch by emailing contact@iamawellness.com or alternatively, drop us a message on Insta.

 

 

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